The seedlings get a little breathing space from the mulch.

Planting Brassica: Diamond Pattern and Mulching

In this post I’m going to go over two techniques that we use at Mossy Banks farm in our planting. For these pictures I’m planting this year’s Brassica: broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbages. The first technique is planting in a diamond pattern. The second technique is for weed control and better moisture retention: mulching. Keyhole Beds […]

Help from Abroad

Last week we had the pleasure of having Mykal and Nico help us out at Mossy Banks. They have been bicycling around the world for the last two years, and had a wealth of knowledge and experience to share with us. It was a pleasure working with them. If anyone gets a knock on their […]

New Rabbits!

Thanks to my friend Matteus, I got in touch with Tim at Mile End Farm, who had some 6-week old does, and a 10-week old doe available, and I got some new rabbits! The brown one is a New Zealand Red cross, and the black ones were something else that has since slipped my mind. They’re beautiful girls!

Any name ideas? Let me know!

Nibbles’ Lamb!

Nibble's Lamb!I’m a bit behind on updating everyone… this little guy was born last week Sunday night! He’s quite the talkative fellow, and will often run up to me baa-ing his little head off. He is smaller than Kia’s lamb. Sometime I hope to get a picture of the two of them together – solid black and solid white makes a pretty picture!

The Lexicon of Sustainability

their logo(Link to their website)

The Lexicon of Sustainability is about defining the terms we see in the grocery store. Industrial Agriculture does not want you to ask these questions, and, more so in America, have made it illegal for people to document the treatment of animals, or how these farms are run.

The folks at the Lexicon of Sustainability are producing a series of short videos that describe the industrial model and more sustainable models. From their website:

“KNOW YOUR FOOD” is a short film series which introduces viewers to the terms and principles that enable them to be more responsible, sustainably-minded consumers. For this series, we’ve worked closely with hundreds of thought leaders from every aspect of our food system to explain the real cost of cheap food, we’ve explored concepts like GMO and Organic, and we have discovered solutions to such challenges as food waste and seafood fraud. By learning these key principles, consumers can do their part to fix our food system.

Some of their videos:

The Story of an Egg

Local

Forage

Grass Fed

The Wall of Farm Dreams

Farm Dream Wall

We have a relatively small operation here at Mossy Banks Farm, especially when compared to the industrial farm model. However, we have many, many ‘dreams’, or plans. One thing we learned at the Joel Salatin talk in Victoria a couple of weekends ago was that no land is used to its full potential. Isn’t that […]

Part of Our Seedy Sunday Haul

Duncan's Seedy Sunday HaulThis year’s Seedy Sunday in Duncan (hosted by the wonderful folks at Cowichan Green Community) was fantastic! The venue was filled with people, but there was plenty of room for socializing and moving around the room.

Pictured here we have a Goji berry, a two more varieties of fig, and a couple Illinois Everberring mulberries.
We also managed to find the last on our list of seeds. I even found someone selling Egyptian Walking Onions! I had just heard about them at the Young Agrarian Mixer in Nanoose a couple of weekends ago. They’re one of the perennial vegetables that we’re looking into for our food forests. We found three varieties of Jerusalem artichokes.

New Bamboo!

New Bamboo!I just got two different varieties of bamboo: a Black bamboo that grows up to 30 feet tall and 3-inches in diameter here on the West Coast (from my mother as an early birthday present – thanks mom!), and a Vivax bamboo that grows up to 50 feet tall and 5-inches in diameter here on the coast (that I bought and added to her order). I’m very excited for the potential of a home-grown lumber source – image all the possibilities!

They are planted between the ditch that leads from the marsh to the lake off our property, and the sheep field fence line – so hopefully it won’t get too out of control. Both varieties have edible shoots, as well!